Organic and Biodynamic Pest Control in Wineries

In ensuring a bountiful harvest, wine farmers make certain that their vineyards are not teeming with weeds or swarmed with bugs and other pests. Nowadays, crop farmers are depending on commercially produced herbicides, pesticides or fertilisers. Meanwhile, organic farmers avoid chemical mixtures but instead use compost or mulch, and employ biodynamic farming.

The application of organic and biodynamic farming in vineyards will allow the grapes to exude more varietal character and have a deeper tang and flavour. Steering clear your winery from pesticides will also yield quality harvest. Moreover, studies show that over reliance to insect repellents or bug killers that are chemical in nature can be harmful to your vineyard.

Fighting the Pests

Problems involving wasp control or managing other pests are among the reasons why some farmers opt for chemical pesticides. That being said, there are a lot of ways on how crop growers can a wage a war against these harmful insects without the use of chemical substances. For instance, farmers can use beneficial insects in combating other insects. This can be done by encouraging a sustainable number of diverse insects, such as lacewings, predatory wasps, and thrips, to grow on vineyards or insectaries. To further intensify the efficiency of this method, crop growers utilise cover crops. Here, insect-friendly and flower-rich crops are being planted on sections of the vineyard. Instead of using pesticides and herbicides, the beneficial insects thriving in the cover crops will act as your natural bug killers or insect repellents.

One of the most common threat in growing crops, such as grapes, are leafhoppers. These pests draw off the liquid from the vines, thereby draining the vine’s strength. In controlling these leafhoppers, farmers introduce lacewings. If the occurrence of leafhoppers on crops can’t be managed, crop growers spray the grapevines with organic oils.

In getting rid of spider mites and aphids, it is recommended to concoct your own organic pesticide. To do this, just mix a teaspoon of liquid dishwashing soap with a cup of vegetable oil. Stir the mixture until it became an emulsion. Then, add a quart of water. Your homemade pesticide should be sprayed every 10 days to your crops.

The methods discussed here are just among the numerous alternatives that winegrowers can employ in pest management. We are optimistic that these approaches will ensure a productive and profitable organic winery.